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Forside Malcolm X (1925-1965) A mural in Ardoyne, Belfast, Northern Ireland featuring Malcolm X. The mural was destroyed soon after painting and no longer exists. It was painted by American artist Mike Alewitz in 2002. Alewitz chose Malcolm X for the mural as there had been tensions in Ardoyne about catholic children attending a protestant school, recollecting the struggle to racially integrate schools in the Civil Rights era in the United States. The mural was destroyed by Sinn Fein during a period of negotiation with Loyalists in Northern Ireland in an attempt to reduce sources of tension between the two groups. 23 July 2002. (CC BY-SA 4.0).

A mural in Ardoyne, Belfast, Northern Ireland featuring Malcolm X. The mural was destroyed soon after painting and no longer exists. It was painted by American artist Mike Alewitz in 2002. Alewitz chose Malcolm X for the mural as there had been tensions in Ardoyne about catholic children attending a protestant school, recollecting the struggle to racially integrate schools in the Civil Rights era in the United States. The mural was destroyed by Sinn Fein during a period of negotiation with Loyalists in Northern Ireland in an attempt to reduce sources of tension between the two groups. 23 July 2002. (CC BY-SA 4.0).

Martin Luther King, Jr. and Malcolm X meet before a press conference. Both men had come to hear the Senate debate on the Civil Rights Act of 1964. This was the only time the two men ever met; their meeting lasted only one minute.26 March 1964. Photo: Staff photographers of U.S. News & World Report. Collection: The Library of Congress, Washington D.C. No known copyright restrictions.

A mural in Ardoyne, Belfast, Northern Ireland featuring Malcolm X. The mural was destroyed soon after painting and no longer exists. It was painted by American artist Mike Alewitz in 2002. Alewitz chose Malcolm X for the mural as there had been tensions in Ardoyne about catholic children attending a protestant school, recollecting the struggle to racially integrate schools in the Civil Rights era in the United States. The mural was destroyed by Sinn Fein during a period of negotiation with Loyalists in Northern Ireland in an attempt to reduce sources of tension between the two groups.
23 July 2002. (CC BY-SA 4.0). Source: Wikimedia Commons.

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