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Forside 1838 Cartoon from 'Punch', 1848, on the presentation of the Chartists' petition to Parliament. The Working Man presents his charter to Lord John Russell (1792-1878), britisk politiker der indtog flere ministerposter bla. som premiereminister. The text says: NOT so VERY UNREASONABLE ! EH? John: My Mistress says she hopes you wont call a meeting of her creditors ; but if you will leave your Bill in the usual way, itshall be properly attended to. The Chartists in London, exited by the revolutionary proceedings in France, held numerous meetings in London and elsewhere, and drew up a formidable petition. From the book: Mr. Punch's history of modern England, Year: 1921 (1920s), By Graves, Charles L. (Charles Larcom), 1856-1944. No known copyright restrictions.

Cartoon from ‘Punch’, 1848, on the presentation of the Chartists’ petition to Parliament. The Working Man presents his charter to Lord John Russell (1792-1878), britisk politiker der indtog flere ministerposter bla. som premiereminister. The text says: NOT so VERY UNREASONABLE ! EH? John: My Mistress says she hopes you wont call a meeting of her creditors ; but if you will leave your Bill in the usual way, itshall be properly attended to. The Chartists in London, exited by the revolutionary proceedings in France, held numerous meetings in London and elsewhere, and drew up a formidable petition. From the book: Mr. Punch’s history of modern England, Year: 1921 (1920s), By Graves, Charles L. (Charles Larcom), 1856-1944. No known copyright restrictions.

THE PEOPLE’S CHARTER. Written by William Lovett on behalf of the London Working Men’s Association and first published in early 1838, the People’s Charter begins by setting out the six demands that would come to define Chartism, including most notably the universal male franchise and the secret ballot. The edition shown here was published at some point in early 1839, before the first Chartist petition was presented to Parliament. Although the Charter would evolve over the next 20 years, the six points – already at the core of radical demands for the previous half century – remained a touchstone of Chartist politics. Public Domain.

Cartoon from ‘Punch’, 1848, on the presentation of the Chartists’ petition to Parliament. The Working Man presents his charter to Lord John Russell (1792-1878), britisk politiker der indtog flere ministerposter bla. som premiereminister. The text says: NOT so VERY UNREASONABLE ! EH? John: My Mistress says she hopes you wont call a meeting of her creditors ; but if you will leave your Bill in the usual way, itshall be properly attended to. The Chartists in London, exited by the revolutionary proceedings in France, held numerous meetings in London and elsewhere, and drew up a formidable petition. From the book: Mr. Punch’s history of modern England, Year: 1921 (1920s), By Graves, Charles L. (Charles Larcom), 1856-1944. No known copyright restrictions. Source: flickr.com.

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