THE PEOPLE’S CHARTER. Written by William Lovett on behalf of the London Working Men’s Association and first published in early 1838, the People’s Charter begins by setting out the six demands that would come to define Chartism, including most notably the universal male franchise and the secret ballot. The edition shown here was published at some point in early 1839, before the first Chartist petition was presented to Parliament. Although the Charter would evolve over the next 20 years, the six points – already at the core of radical demands for the previous half century – remained a touchstone of Chartist politics. Public Domain.
THE PEOPLE’S CHARTER. Written by William Lovett on behalf of the London Working Men’s Association and first published in early 1838, the People’s Charter begins by setting out the six demands that would come to define Chartism, including most notably the universal male franchise and the secret ballot. The edition shown here was published at some point in early 1839, before the first Chartist petition was presented to Parliament. Although the Charter would evolve over the next 20 years, the six points – already at the core of radical demands for the previous half century – remained a touchstone of Chartist politics. Public Domain. Source: Kennington chartist project.

Socialistisk Biblioteks Tidslinje med links til begivenheder og personer i 1838.


Se også Index over personer, organisationer/partier og værker (som bøger, malerier, mm.), steder, begivenheder, mv., der er omtalt på hele Tidslinjen, titler og indhold på emnelisterne osv.

 

21. maj 1838

Den første britiske massebevægelse af arbejdere (forløber for arbejderbevægelsen) vedtager “People’s Charter” på møde i Glasgow, med krav om udvidelse af demokratiet i et 6-punkts program.

National Charter Association membership card. 1840
National Charter Association membership card. 1840

Leksikalt/Encyclopedias

Sites:

Artikler/Articles

Chartist Revolution. By Dominic Alexander (Counterfire, September 23, 2021). Review of Rob Sewell, Chartist Revolution (Wellred Books, 2020, 413 p.). “… an important history of the world’s first working-class political movement, shows its relevance to later revolutionary struggles.”

Chartism: the first great working class movement (Counterfire, May 1, 2021; first published 2011). “Chartism was a mass movement for political and social change in the 1830s and 1840s – John Westmoreland looks at the crucial lessons it provides for activists today.”

The chartists (Socialism or your money back, May 8, 2013). On the radicalism and folded arms-theory of the Chartists.

Cartoon from 'Punch', 1848, on the presentation of the Chartists' petition to Parliament. The Working Man presents his charter to Lord John Russell (1792-1878), britisk politiker der indtog flere ministerposter bla. som premiereminister. The text says: NOT so VERY UNREASONABLE ! EH? John: My Mistress says she hopes you wont call a meeting of her creditors ; but if you will leave your Bill in the usual way, itshall be properly attended to. The Chartists in London, exited by the revolutionary proceedings in France, held numerous meetings in London and elsewhere, and drew up a formidable petition. From the book: Mr. Punch's history of modern England, Year: 1921 (1920s), By Graves, Charles L. (Charles Larcom), 1856-1944. No known copyright restrictions.
Cartoon from ‘Punch’, 1848, on the presentation of the Chartists’ petition to Parliament. The Working Man presents his charter to Lord John Russell (1792-1878), britisk politiker der indtog flere ministerposter bla. som premiereminister. The text says: NOT so VERY UNREASONABLE ! EH? John: My Mistress says she hopes you wont call a meeting of her creditors ; but if you will leave your Bill in the usual way, itshall be properly attended to. The Chartists in London, exited by the revolutionary proceedings in France, held numerous meetings in London and elsewhere, and drew up a formidable petition. From the book: Mr. Punch’s history of modern England, Year: 1921 (1920s), By Graves, Charles L. (Charles Larcom), 1856-1944. No known copyright restrictions. Source: flickr.com.

The Chartist series. By Keith Flett (Socialist Worker, December 2006):
1. The Chartists: A militant struggle for the rights of workers (Issue 2029, 2 December)

2. The Chartists turn left after the defeats of 1848 (Issue 2030, 9 December)
3. The Chartists remain an inspiration for the fight for freedom now (Issue 2031, 16 December)

The origins of the Labour movement. Part 51, – i: Neil Faulkner: A Marxist History of the World (Counterfire, 31 October 2011)

The Dignity of Chartism. By John Westmoreland (Counterfire, November 19, 2015). Review of Dorothy Thompson’ book (Verso, 2015, 334 p.)

Chartism’s hidden history. By Judy Cox (International Socialism, Issue 114, April 2007). Review of Keith Flett, Chartism After 1848: the Working Class and the Politics of Radical Education (Merlin Press, 2006).
See also Review by David Renton + Response by Keith Flett (Reviews in History, December 2009)

Newport Rising: the Chartists are coming: 3. November 1839. By Phil Knight. (Socialist Review, Issue 235, November 1999)

Peter Murray McDouall and ”˜Physical Force Chartism’. By Ray Challinor (International Socialism, Issue 12, Spring 1981, p.53-84; online at Marxists Internet Archive)

View of the Great Chartist Meeting on Kennington Common. (on 10 April 1848). This daguerreotype, purchased by Prince Albert, records the immense crowds at one of the Chartist rallies held in South London in 1848. Calling for political reform, and spurred on by the recent February Revolution in France, the Chartist movement was seen by many as a terrifying threat to the established order. Fears were so great that on the eve of the meeting pictured, the Duke of Wellington stationed troops across London and the royal family were removed to Osborne House on the Isle of Wight. Photo: Daguerreotype by William Edward Kilburn (1818 - 1891), restored by Bammesk. Public Domain.
View of the Great Chartist Meeting on Kennington Common. (on 10 April 1848). This daguerreotype, purchased by Prince Albert, records the immense crowds at one of the Chartist rallies held in South London in 1848. Calling for political reform, and spurred on by the recent February Revolution in France, the Chartist movement was seen by many as a terrifying threat to the established order. Fears were so great that on the eve of the meeting pictured, the Duke of Wellington stationed troops across London and the royal family were removed to Osborne House on the Isle of Wight. Photo: Daguerreotype by William Edward Kilburn (1818 – 1891), restored by Bammesk. Public Domain. Source: Wikimedia Commons.

See on the Kennington Common Mass Meeting 10th April, 1848 (Spartacus Educational)

The Mass Meeting at Kennington Common: 10 April 1848 (The History Student)


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