Graffiti on house wall in Newtown, Australia - The house might be demolished now. Tommie Smith (center) and John Carlos (right) showing the raised fist on the podium after the 200m in the 1968 Summer Olympics. Silver medallist Peter Norman from Australia (left) joins them in wearing Olympic Project for Human Rights badges. (CC BY 2.0)
Graffiti on house wall in Newtown, Australia - The house might be demolished now. Tommie Smith (center) and John Carlos (right) showing the raised fist on the podium after the 200m in the 1968 Summer Olympics. Silver medallist Peter Norman from Australia (left) joins them in wearing Olympic Project for Human Rights badges. (CC BY 2.0)

Black power demonstration ved OL i Mexico

Ved medaljeoverrækkelsen i 200 meter-løb for herrer den 16. oktober 1968 demonstrerer de amerikanske løbere Tommie Smith (guld) and John Carlos (bronze), bl.a. med Black Power-bevægelsens behandskede knyttede hånd.


American sprinters Tommie Smith and John Carlos, along with Australian Peter Norman, during the award ceremony of the 200 m race at the Mexican Olympic games. During the awards ceremony, Smith (center) and Carlos protested against racial discrimination: they went barefoot on the podium and listened to their anthem bowing their heads and raising a fist with a black glove. Mexico City, Mexico, 16 October 1968. Source: http://www.gettyimages.co.uk/detail/news-photo/the-american-sprinters-tommie-smith-john-carlos-and-peter-news-photo/186173327 Photo: Angelo Cozzi (Mondadori Publishers) Public Domain.American sprinters Tommie Smith and John Carlos, along with Australian Peter Norman, during the award ceremony of the 200 m race at the Mexican Olympic games. During the awards ceremony, Smith (center) and Carlos protested against racial discrimination: they went barefoot on the podium and listened to their anthem bowing their heads and raising a fist with a black glove. Mexico City, Mexico, 16 October 1968. Source: http://www.gettyimages.co.uk/detail/news-photo/the-american-sprinters-tommie-smith-john-carlos-and-peter-news-photo/186173327 Photo: Angelo Cozzi (Mondadori Publishers) Public Domain.
American sprinters Tommie Smith and John Carlos, along with Australian Peter Norman, during the award ceremony of the 200 m race at the Mexican Olympic games. During the awards ceremony, Smith (center) and Carlos protested against racial discrimination: they went barefoot on the podium and listened to their anthem bowing their heads and raising a fist with a black glove. Mexico City, Mexico, 16 October 1968. Source: http://www.gettyimages.co.uk/detail/news-photo/the-american-sprinters-tommie-smith-john-carlos-and-peter-news-photo/186173327 Photo: Angelo Cozzi (Mondadori Publishers) Public Domain.

Se:

1968 Olympics Black Power salute (Wikipedia.org). Med links til løbernes biografier.

Manden med den knyttede næve. Af Gary Younge (Information.dk, 4. april 2012). Interview: “Da John Carlos hævede sin knyttede næve til black power-salut ved OL i 1968, kom det til at ændre historiens gang i det 20. århundrede – og hans eget liv for altid. Men den sorte sportsmand fortryder intet.”

Tommie Smith, John Carlos, and the 1968 Olympics: 50 years later (Verso, Blog, 16 October 2018). “Today marks the 50th anniversary of Tommie Smith and John Carlos’ iconic black power salute on the 200-meter dash podium at the 1968 Mexico City Olympics. Jules Boykoff explains the significance of this radical act in this excerpt from Power Games [Verso, 2016, 352 p.].”

Fists of freedom: An Olympic story not taught in school. By Dave Zirin (The Nation, July 25, 2012). “… looking back at perhaps the most political, controversial, inspiring moment in Olympics, if not sports, history: the medal stand black gloved salute of 200 meter runners Tommie Smith and John Carlos.”

The John Carlos story: a life of protest. By Paul Hampton (Solidarity/Workers’ Liberty, Issue 252, 11 July 2012). “The black-gloved salute from the podium at the 1968 Olympics is one of the most riveting images in the history of protest, surpassing its sporting moment. [Dave Zirin’s] The John Carlos Story (Haymarket 2012) is the autobiography of one of the central protagonists.”

Tommie Smith’s Olympic gesture of defiance (Socialist Worker, Issue 2123, 18 October 2008). “Athlete and campaigner Tommie Smith spoke to Ken Olende about his iconic protest against racism at the Olympic Games 40 years ago – and how it came about.”

The explosive 1968 Olympics. By Dave Zirin (International Socialist Review, Issue 61, September-October 2008). “Smith and Carlos’s stunning gesture of revolt and resistance was not the result of some spontaneous urge to get face time on the evening news, but the result of several years of organizing.”

Silent Gesture: Gold-medalist Tommie Smith on his Black Power salute at 1968 Olympics (Democracy Now! February 21, 2007). Video/Audio/Transcript:  “The raised fists of two African-American Olympic medal winners at the 1968 Olympics in Mexico City is one of the most iconic images of our time. The man standing on the podium in first place, Tommie Smith, talks about that moment and his new autobiography, ‘Silent Gesture’.”

Revolt of the Black athletes: How Black Power took center stage at the 1968 Olympics (SocialistWorker.org, August 15, 2003). “Dave Zirin explains the political radicalization of the time and the spirit of revolt that surrounds what is one of the most famous moments in sports, and civil rights, history.”

Video:

Black History: 1968 Olympics (YouTube.com, 2008, 2:25 min.). “Nicholas Love discussed the actions of Tommie Smith and John Carlos during the 1968 Olympic Games.”

Black Power Salute (YouTube.com, 2014, 3:25 min.)

Se også:

Redeeming the Olympic Martyrs of 1968. By David Zirin (CounterPunch, September 23, 2005). “1968. There was never a year when the worlds of sports and politics collided so breathlessly, without mercy or respite.”

A moving tribute. By Richard Philips and Ismet Redzovic (World Socialist Web Site, 20 January 2009). “Salute is a documentary about Australian sprinter Peter Norman and his public gesture of political solidarity with African American athletes John Carlos and Tommy Smith at the 1968 Olympic Games.”

Se også på Socialistisk Bibliotek:

Også ved præmieoverrækkelsen i 400 m. løb for mænd blev der hilst med knyttede næver fra de amerikanske vindere James, Evans og Freeman.
Også ved præmieoverrækkelsen i 400 m. løb for mænd blev der hilst med knyttede næver fra de amerikanske vindere James, Evans og Freeman.

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