Illustration of William Shakespeare reciting his play Hamlet to his family. His wife, Anne Hathaway, is sitting in the chair on the right; his son Hamnet is behind him on the left; his two daughters Susanna and Judith are on the right and left of him. (Hamnet&Judith are twins), circa 1890. Photo of Engraving by unknown German artist. Public Domain Mark 1.0.
Illustration of William Shakespeare reciting his play Hamlet to his family. His wife, Anne Hathaway, is sitting in the chair on the right; his son Hamnet is behind him on the left; his two daughters Susanna and Judith are on the right and left of him. (Hamnet&Judith are twins), circa 1890. Photo of Engraving by unknown German artist. Public Domain Mark 1.0.


Socialistisk Biblioteks Tidslinje med links til begivenheder og personer i 1616.


Se også Index over personer, organisationer/partier og værker (som bøger, malerier, mm.), steder, begivenheder, mv., der er omtalt på hele Tidslinjen, titler og indhold på emnelisterne osv.

23. april 1616

Den engelske poet og skuespilforfatter William Shakespeare dør i Stratford-upon-Avon. (Dåbsdag 23. april 1564 samme sted).

Senere portræt af William Shakespeare
Senere portræt af William Shakespeare

Leksikalt:

Se også:

  • Om penge (1844). Af Karl Marx (Økonomisk-filosofiske manuskripter; online på Marxistisk Internet Arkiv; Danske afdeling)

1616shakespeare.jpg

In English

Encyclopedias:

Sites:

Internet Shakespeare Editions (University of Victoria and the Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council of Canada). Shakespeare works – His plays in performance – His life and and times.

Articles in English:

Four hundred years since William Shakespeare’s death. Part 1-2. By David Walsh (World Socialist Web Site, 19-20 December 2016) + a conversation with James Shapiro of Columbia University. “Shakespeare contributed significantly to how human beings see and understand each other and the world.”

400 years since the death of Shakespeare: A revolutionary in literature. Part 1-4. By Alan Woods (In Defence of Marxism, 9 September – 7 October 2016). “In Shakespeare’s plays, particularly the history plays, we have an eloquent description in literature of what Machiavelli demonstrated in political philosophy.”

Shakesperae 400 years on. By John Molyneux (Irish Marxist Review, Vol.5, No.15, 2016, p.64-67). “What unites these three immense figures [Shakespeare, Michelangelo and Rembrandt] is that they are products of the epoch that
can be described as the birth of capitalism …”

Marx’s Shakespeare. By Sean Ledwith (Counterfire, April 21, 2016). “Marx was always alert to the dissident potential of a uniquely gifted voice.”

Shakespeare belongs to us. By Gareth Jenkins (International Socialism, Issue 150, Spring 2016). “Shakespeare [explored] the full tragedy of the clash between old and new.”

Bring back the bawdy Bard. By Jack Farmer (Socialist Review, June 2012). “Should we care? Isn’t Shakespeare just the preserve of the pretentious literati who get a kick out of saying they like stuff that most people struggle to understand?”

Shakespeare’s The Merchant Of Venice: A world consumed with trade and commerce.
By Richard Adams and Ramón Valle (World Socialist Web Site, 14 April 2012)

Coriolanus: Shakespeare tragedy puts masses on stage. By Gareth Jenkins (Socialist Worker, Issue 2287, 28 January 2012). “Director Ralph Fiennes’s new film of William Shakespeare’s tragedy about ancient Rome is excellent.”

In defense of Shakespeare: a conversation with veteran Australian actor and director John Bell. By David Walsh (World Socialist Web Site, 13 December 2011)

Anonymous: An ignorant assault on Shakespeare. By David Walsh (World Socialist Web Site, 23 November 2011). Review of Roland Emmerich’s film. See also: An exchange: More on the contemporary assault on Shakespeare. By David Walsh (World Socialist Web Site, 30 November 2011)

Hodge's conjectural Globe reconstruction based on archeological and documentary evidence. January 1958. Source: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Globe_Theatre#/media/File:Hodge%27s_conjectural_Globe_reconstruction.jpg
Hodge’s conjectural Globe reconstruction based on archeological and documentary evidence. January 1958. Source: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Globe_Theatre#/media/File:Hodge%27s_conjectural_Globe_reconstruction.jpg

Shakespeare, literary history and Marxism. By Joe Hartney (International Socialism, Issue 117, Winter 2008). Review of Stephen Greenblatt, Will in the World: How Shakespeare became Shakespeare (Jonathan Cape, 2004), and James Shapiro, 1599: A Year in the Life of William Shakespeare (Faber, 2005)

Radicalism reclaimed. By Judy Cox (Socialist Review, September 2004). Review of Michael Rosen, William Shakespeare: In his times, for our times (Redwords, 2004, 95 p.)

Shakespeare is relevant every time (Socialist Worker, Issue 1907, 26 June 2004). “Michael Rosen has written a new book about Shakespeare. He spoke to Socialist Worker about why people shouldn’t be put off Shakespeare’s plays.”

The origins of Shakespeare’s drama. By Colin Sparks (International Socialism, Issue 40, Autumn 1988, p.89–104). “… I have here concentrated on two plays which exemplify a central problem of Shakespearean analysis: King Lear and The Tempest.”

Shakespeare: A Marxist interpretation. By Aleksandr A. Smirnov (New York, The Critics Group, 1936, 93 p.; online at Marxists Internet Archive)

Bacon and the characters of Shakespeare’s plays. By Anatoly Lunacharsky (On Literature and Art, 1934; online at Marxists Internet Archive). Longer article.

Dostoyevsky’s plurality of voices [Chapter I]. By A.V. Lunacharsky (1929). (Marxists Internet Archive). “Marx had the greatest regard for Shakespeare as the bard of developing capitalism and of all the infinite variety of the capitalist epoch.”

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Literature/Books:

  • Eight tragedies of Shakespeare. By Victor Kiernan (Zed Books, 2016, 312 p.). See Introduction by Terry Eagleton + Extracts of the 1996 edition (Verso) at Google Books
  • Shakespeare, poet and citizen. By Victor Kiernan (Zed Books, 2016, 280 p.). See extracts of the 1993 edition (Verso) at Google Books
  • William Shakespeare: In his times, for our times. By Michael Rosen (Redwords, 2014, 95 p.) (Revolutionary Portraits). See interview/review above.
  • Shakespeare and Marx (pdf). By Gabriel Egan (Oxford University Press, 2004, 168 p.)
  • The gathering storm: Shakespeare’s English and Roman history plays: A Marxist approach. By Paul N. Siegel (Redwords, 1992, 204 p.). See extracts of the 1986 edition at Google Books
  • William Shakespeare and more original sin. By Paul O’Flinn (chapter 9 in: Them and Us in Literature. Pluto Press, 1975; online at Marxists Internet Archive)

See also / Se også:

  • The Power of Money. By Karl Marx (Economic and Philosophic Manuscripts of 1844; online at Marxists Interne Archive)

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