"Kampsang for Rhin-Armeen" (Chant de guerre pour l'Armée du Rhin) til forsvar for den revolutionære unge franske republik, blev republikkens kampsang 1795, "Marseillaisen", og fransk nationalsang. Artist: W. Holland in London, 1792. Public Domain. Source: Wikimedia Commons.

Socialistisk Biblioteks Tidslinje med links til begivenheder og personer i 1792.


Se også Index over personer, organisationer/partier og værker (som bøger, malerier, mm.), steder, begivenheder, mv., der er omtalt på hele Tidslinjen, titler og indhold på emnelisterne osv.

 

25. april 1792

Marche des Marseillois. Revolutionary satire: song sheet recording the 'Marseillaise', under French soldiers marching and singing; version of French print. 10 November 1792. Hand-coloured etching by Richard Newton. Collection: Museum Britànica. Public Domain.
Marche des Marseillois. Revolutionary satire: song sheet recording the ‘Marseillaise’, under French soldiers marching and singing; version of French print. 10 November 1792. Hand-coloured etching by Richard Newton. Collection: Museum Britànica. Public Domain. Source: Wikimedia Commons.

Natten til den 25. april 1792 skrev og komponerede Rouget de Lisle en “Kampsang for Rhin-Armeen” (Chant de guerre pour l’Armée du Rhin) i Strasbourg til forsvar for den unge revolutionære franske republik. Sangen blev republikkens kampsang i 1795, Marseillaisen, og fransk nationalsang.

Se:

  • Marseillaisen (Wikipedia.dk). Leksikonartikel med links til større engelske og franske artikler om sangen, forfatteren mv. + danske oversættelser.
  • Russia 1918-1922 (Nationalanthems.info.ru). Om brugen af sangen i Den Russiske Revolution.

Marseillaisen i Danmark og sangene i Napoleonstidens Danmark (Det Kongelige Bibliotek). Herunder:

P.A. Heibergs gendigtning (Kailliope.org). På dansk er ikke i samlingen fra Kongelige Bibliotek, på trods af, at dens indflydelse i samtiden er nævnt.

Rouget de Lisle chantant la Marseillaise. Oil on canvas painted 1849 by Isidore Pils (1813/1815–1875), french painter. Depicted peopple: Claude Joseph Rouget de Lisle and Philippe-Frédéric de Dietrich. Collection: Musée historique de Strasbourg. Source/Photographer: Unknown. Public Domain.
Rouget de Lisle chantant la Marseillaise. Oil on canvas painted 1849 by Isidore Pils (1813/1815–1875), french painter. Depicted peopple: Claude Joseph Rouget de Lisle and Philippe-Frédéric de Dietrich. Collection: Musée historique de Strasbourg. Source/Photographer: Unknown. Public Domain. Source: Wikimedia Commons.

Se også:

Worker’s Marseillaise (Wikipedia.org). Med link til tyske udgave.

Se på Socialistisk Bibliotek:


 

31. juli 1792

Grundstenen nedlægges til Frihedsstøtten (stod færdig i september 1797).

Se også på Socialistisk Bibliotek

 

 

 


 

4. august 1792

Digteren Shelley fødes (dør 8. juli 1822)

Percy Bysshe Shelley. Original steel engraving by W. Find (1787-1852) for J. Murray, 1833. Public Domain.
Percy Bysshe Shelley. Original steel engraving by W. Find (1787-1852) for J. Murray, 1833. Public Domain. Source: Wikimedia Commons.

Links:

Peterloo and Shelley. Part 2: Shelley’s politics and his Peterloo poems. By Paul Bond (World Socialist Web Site, 1 October 2019). “The following is the concluding part of a two-part article focusing on the response to the massacre by the great poet Percy Bysshe Shelley.”

Percy Bysshe Shelley: Poet and Revolutionary. By Alex Snowdon (Counterfire, November 6, 2015). Review of Jacqueline Mulhallen’s book (Pluto Press, 2015, 170 p.). See also review by Matthew Cookson: The radicalism of Shelley (RS21, January 6, 2016) + extracts from the book: A philosophical review of reform + The necessity of atheism

Rise like lions after slumber: revolutionary Shelley (Counterfire, 30 September 2012). “Percy Shelley was a radical poet, polemicist and political activist. Jacqueline Mulhallen traces the revolutionary thread that ran through this extraordinary writer’s life and work.”

The theatre of Shelley. By Katherine Connelly (Counterfire, 10 June 2011). Review of Jacqueline Mulhallen’s book (Open Books, 2010, 289 p.): “Mulhallen’s groundbreaking research redefines our view of Shelley as an artist and as a revolutionary, and is an important and inspiring contribution to understanding Shelley.”

Shelley’s plays still emit the light of freedom. By Jacqueline Mulhallen (Socialist Worker, Issue 2114, 16 August 2008). “Shelley is well-known for poetry that opposed oppression, but his plays also show his hatred of tyranny.”

Shelley: a socialist poet (World Socialist Movement, 13 August 2006). “Eventually I got my own copy of Shelley and, over many, many years, I have prized it as the first real socialist literature I ever read.”

Rise like lions? Shelley and the revolutionary left. By William Keach (International Socialism, Issue 75, Summer 1997, p.91-105). “The task of reclaiming Shelley’s poetry for the revolutionary left, most notably undertaken by Paul Foot in his book Red Shelley, inevitably raises difficulties and complications which I would like to address.”

Shelley: The trumpet of a prophecy. By Paul Foot (International Socialism, No.79, June 1975, p.26-32). “Shelley wanted the truth about repression and exploitation to go ringing through each heart and brain, so that each heart and brain would unite in action to end that repression and exploitation.”

Video: Shelly and revolution. By Paul Foot (SWP Recording; YouTube, 1:28:38 hour). Recorded speach.

Shelley and Socialism by Edward and Eleanor Marx-Aveling (To-Day, April 1888, p.103-116; online at Marxists Internet Archive)

Litteratur:

Se også på Socialistisk Bibliotek:


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