Flora's crazy wagon. Allegory of the Tulip Mania. The goddess of flowers is riding along with three drinking and money weighing men and two women on a car. Weavers from Haarlem have thrown away their equipment and are following the car. The destiny of the car is shown in the background: it will disappear in the sea. Oil on panel painted 1637/1638 by Hendrik Gerritsz Pot (1580/1581–1657), Dutch painter, draughtsman and miniaturist. Collection: Frans Hals Museum, Haarlem, Netherlands Photo: van Diepen en Fuhri Snethlage (1990), Frans Hals museum.
Flora's crazy wagon. Allegory of the Tulip Mania. The goddess of flowers is riding along with three drinking and money weighing men and two women on a car. Weavers from Haarlem have thrown away their equipment and are following the car. The destiny of the car is shown in the background: it will disappear in the sea. Oil on panel painted 1637/1638 by Hendrik Gerritsz Pot (1580/1581–1657), Dutch painter, draughtsman and miniaturist. Collection: Frans Hals Museum, Haarlem, Netherlands Photo: van Diepen en Fuhri Snethlage (1990), Frans Hals museum. Source: Wikimedia Commons.

Socialistisk Biblioteks Tidslinje med links til begivenheder og personer i 1637.


Se også Index over personer, organisationer/partier og værker (som bøger, malerier, mm.), steder, begivenheder, mv., der er omtalt på hele Tidslinjen, titler og indhold på emnelisterne osv.

 

3. Februar 1637

Spekulationspriserne når deres højeste under verdens første økonomske boble-økonomi, det nederlandske (hollandske) tulipan-krak.

Se:

Tulip mania (Wikipedia.org)

Tulipankrakket (Wikipedia.no). Fremhævet norsk Wiki-artikel.

Tulipmania: Money, Honor, and Knowledge in the Dutch Golden Age. By Anne Goldgar (The University of Chicago Press, 2007, 458 p., partly preview-edition; online at Scribd.org)

Satire on Tulpomania. Monkeys in contemporary 17th century Dutch dress are shown dealing in tulips. A satirical commentary on speculators during the time of "Tulip Mania", an economic bubble that centered around rare tulip bulbs. At left, one monkey points to flowering tulips while another holds up a tulip and a moneybag. Bulbs are weighed, money is counted, a lavish business dinner is enjoyed. The monkey at left has a list of rare tulips, his sword denotes upper class status. Farther back, a monkey sits like a nobleman astride a horse. One in mid-foreground draws up a bill of sale; the owl on his shoulder symbolizes foolishness and ignobility. Brueghel is not only ridiculing tulip speculators as brainless monkeys, the work is an object lesson for the folly of speculating to such an extent in such a transient thing as a mere bloom. In the denouement at right, a monkey urinates on the now worthless tulips; fellow speculators in debt are brought before the magistrate or weep in the dock. A frustrated buyer brandishes his fists, while at the back right a speculator is carried to his grave. Oil on panel painted circa 1640 by Jan Brueghel the Younger (1601–1678), Flemish painter and draughtsman. Collection: Frans Hals Museum, Haarlem, Netherlands. Public Domain.
Satire on Tulpomania. Monkeys in contemporary 17th century Dutch dress are shown dealing in tulips. A satirical commentary on speculators during the time of “Tulip Mania”, an economic bubble that centered around rare tulip bulbs. At left, one monkey points to flowering tulips while another holds up a tulip and a moneybag. Bulbs are weighed, money is counted, a lavish business dinner is enjoyed. The monkey at left has a list of rare tulips, his sword denotes upper class status. Farther back, a monkey sits like a nobleman astride a horse. One in mid-foreground draws up a bill of sale; the owl on his shoulder symbolizes foolishness and ignobility. Brueghel is not only ridiculing tulip speculators as brainless monkeys, the work is an object lesson for the folly of speculating to such an extent in such a transient thing as a mere bloom. In the denouement at right, a monkey urinates on the now worthless tulips; fellow speculators in debt are brought before the magistrate or weep in the dock. A frustrated buyer brandishes his fists, while at the back right a speculator is carried to his grave. Oil on panel painted circa 1640 by Jan Brueghel the Younger (1601–1678), Flemish painter and draughtsman. Collection: Frans Hals Museum, Haarlem, Netherlands. Public Domain. Source: Wikimedia Commons.

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